Another prompt
#21
Thanks, Maj. It's entirely up to you whether or not you'd like to write a traditional pantoum. Is this your book here

CRNDLSM, yes, I suppose it could count as new formalism, if that's the right term. Most things do nowadays.
All best,
Leaf
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#22
(05-13-2021, 02:21 AM)Leaf Wrote:  Thanks, Maj. It's entirely up to you whether or not you'd like to write a traditional pantoum. Is this your book here

CRNDLSM, yes, I suppose it could count as new formalism, if that's the right term. Most things do nowadays.

Yeah that's my book, how long did it take you to find it?
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#23
Just seconds, Maj. I googled 'handbook of poetic forms pdf' and it was the first result.
All best,
Leaf
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#24
I still highly recommend “Writing Poems” by Robert Wallace & Michele Boisseau.
I’ve had my dog-eared copy for over 25 years now, and it always comes in handy.
Do your poems a big favor and check it out.
If nothing else, it’ll keep ya grounded.

Besides that, read a wide variety of other poets.

I am guilty of not writing in-depth critiques, and the Pen has many great examples in the “spot lighting the hogs” forum. I believe that writing better critiques is a key to writing better poetry (if only I took my own advice).
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#25
Just popping in before bed (at 9:15pm, lol; I was up very early this morning).

Mark, I googled the book you mention, but I can't seem to find an e-version, unfortunately (I have arthritis in my hands, to the extent that I struggle with holding things).

After a break, I returned to a fairly intense workshop site about a month ago. You have to critique 'several' poems for each one you post there, so I do a lot of reading as well as posting my rubbish, lol. I'd recommend it to anyone who likes to get a good range of responses to their work. Sometimes you get bashed about a bit, but that's all to the good. I find it contrasts quite interestingly with the other two sites (incl. PigPen) to which I belong.
All best,
Leaf
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#26
What workshop are you referring to?

Solid critique is a very good thing, and that requirement before posting is a good idea.

I, especially, need to work much harder at my critiques.

Thanks Leaf,
Mark

p.s. I wish there was an ebook version of that book for you.
I actually like waking up to dawn- being retired has the advantage of not being tied to the clock.
It also gives me a chance to check on the hatchlings in my yard- cardinals are utterly fascinating, along with all the other competing wildlife...
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#27
You're welcome, Mark.

I'm referring to the Eratosphere, the workshop site of poetry magazine Ablemuse.

The 'sphere has positive and negative points. For example, a lot of new members are put off by the fact that you have to post 15 'solid' critiques before you're allowed to post your own poems for critique. You really have to know poetry. And it doesn't feel particularly diverse there, at least to me. A few things have happened that have made me feel uncomfortable. Once a new member posted a poem and it had a fairly unusual style. A couple of established members critiqued her style and she defended it. That sparked a sort of 'ganging up', which wasn't pleasant to see. I posted a kind comment, which didn't make me particularly popular. Overall, my experience has been useful; and when things get a bit intense, I just take time off to recover, lol.

Yes, I'm a fan of ebooks and I feel lucky I'm able to work online. I wish I was retired, but I work from home, which I enjoy. Today a blue tit landed on my office window frame and spent some time scratching about; I think he/she was finding insects. (Bird poems are usually appreciated on the 'sphere.)
All best,
Leaf
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#28
(05-15-2021, 02:19 AM)Leaf Wrote:  You're welcome, Mark.

I'm referring to the Eratosphere, the workshop site of poetry magazine Ablemuse.

The 'sphere has positive and negative points. For example, a lot of new members are put off by the fact that you have to post 15 'solid' critiques before you're allowed to post your own poems for critique. You really have to know poetry. And it doesn't feel particularly diverse there, at least to me. A few things have happened that have made me feel uncomfortable. Once a new member posted a poem and it had a fairly unusual style. A couple of established members critiqued her style and she defended it. That sparked a sort of 'ganging up', which wasn't pleasant to see. I posted a kind comment, which didn't make me particularly popular. Overall, my experience has been useful; and when things get a bit intense, I just take time off to recover, lol.

Yes, I'm a fan of ebooks and I feel lucky I'm able to work online. I wish I was retired, but I work from home, which I enjoy. Today a blue tit landed on my office window frame and spent some time scratching about; I think he/she was finding insects. (Bird poems are usually appreciated on the 'sphere.)

I took a look at Eratosphere.  Some things I like about their setup, but the tone of the comments (what I saw was mostly excited praise) is a lot more academic sounding and that puts me off.  It was an intriguing and intimidating site.  But not one for me.  It's interesting how much time is spent by readers/poets explaining the poem rather than critiquing specifics.  This is only a cursory glance of course.  I admire your adventuresomeness of going to various forums.
“All persons, living or dead, are entirely coincidental.”  Kurt Vonnegut
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#29
Yes, the 'sphere's fairly academic. I like that because another site where I post isn't academic at all. Re. specifics and explanations, emphasis on the latter is due to a general preference for writing poetry that communicates clearly. The majority of members aren't writing for publications favouring opaque poems.

Mostly excited praise? You must've caught the 'spherians on a good day, lol.
All best,
Leaf
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