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#1


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   i hand my sister a poem
   she's impressed with its life-affirming qualities
   (i thought it was about suicide)
   
   i can't imagine
   (literally)
   what someone in the late 1500's thought of a Shakespeare poem
   someone with a different vocabulary.
   someone who had their Greeks and Romans straight
   
   when i find a poet who
   "really speaks to me"
   is that because they push the ten buttons i have available?
   
   when i learn more
   will i have a hundred?
   
   will the old ten still be there?
   
   skip just a few hundred years into the future
   and someone is watching Allen Ginsberg read poetry in their head
   using their neural brain implant (Sony) they got at birth
   and that connects them to anything everywhere
   
   Allen says: "television"
   
   television?
   
   oh course they have access to scads of definitions
   (even the picture of a 1957 Dumont tv set)
   
   but...
   
   a system that only sent pictures one way?
   a heavy external device that usually sat on a table?
   and what the hell is "black and white"?
   
   they will (of course)
   be intimately familiar with the Oscar Mayer Wiener-mobile
 
   some things
 
   are indeed
 
   timeless
   
                  - - -



While comment and discussion of topic(s) mentioned above are hoped for,
thoughtful digressions and truly creative egressions (especially the latter)
will be transcendentally luxuriated in.

almost terse
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#2
I am given to understand that Greeks and Romans were always at least a little bit bent Wink

Here I find the fulcrum:

Quote:when i find a poet who
"really speaks to me"
is that because they push the ten buttons i have available?

when i learn more
will i have a hundred?

will the old ten still be there?

I can't help thinking of the dear (bent) Greek Socrates, knowing only that he knows nothing. It is easy to please an idiot, he has but one button (or lever, I suppose, if it's a man we're talking about) -- but the more we learn, the harder it is to impress us.

This is probably why I feel compelled to suspend any predilections toward complex thought when I want to be entertained, and head straight to the most base and vulgar.
It could be worse
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#3
(02-09-2012, 12:54 PM)Leanne Wrote:  I can't help thinking of the dear (bent) Greek Socrates, knowing only that he knows nothing. It is easy to please an idiot, he has but one button (or lever, I suppose, if it's a man we're talking about) -- but the more we learn, the harder it is to impress us.

This is probably why I feel compelled to suspend any predilections toward complex thought when I want to be entertained, and head straight to the most base and vulgar.

Title of pop book: "Men have Levers, Women have Buttons".

Vulgarity, when done properly, requires vast quantities of complex thought.


Q: If it's so easy to please idiots, why do politicians have to try so hard?

A: ________________

almost terse
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#4
A: Politicians are a very special kind of idiot. It takes a lot of PR just to bring them up to the same level as the regular idiots who vote for them.
It could be worse
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#5
Actually the answer is quite simple. Politicians are so busy wondering what people are thinking about them, they have no capacity to think of people in any other way. Thus they are incapable of even framing such a question. Relaying on their handlers advice of the old adage, "Give 'em what they want" coming into conflict with Lincoln's maxim that "you can't please all of the people all of the time", they are forced to hire scads of dark workers, in the art of statistical analysis to locate the greatest cross section within their cross hairs. Of course having never learned to aim, it all becomes one giant cluster-fuck game of pop-shot give away, which of course comes from the taxes they draw from my veins at the threat of seizing my house and property for themselves should I refuse to give my tithe to the governmental god. However, as the group they are giving away to, far exceeds the group they are taking from, this has never presented them with a problem...yet!
How long after picking up the brush, the first masterpiece?

The goal is not to obfuscate that which is clear, but make clear that which isn't.
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