Ranting about meter
#1
I've read a few comments around the traps lately, both here and on other sites (admittedly, mostly on other sites) that refer to meter as "rigid" and rhyme as "restrictive" or other similar terms.

This irritates me as I've never found either to be true, and the way rhyme and meter are spoken about by those who don't use them is quite derogatory. The term "old fashioned" gets thrown around a fair bit as well.

Now, I've never heard the bass line or drum beat of a rock song referred to as "rigid". Meter is no different. It is the rhythm, the beat, the bones to hang your fleshy words on. It keeps time and makes sure everything stays in its place.

As for rhyme being "restrictive" or "limiting" -- it's as limited as your imagination. If you can't think outside the box, then you're stuck no matter what form or technique you choose.

Using form, meter, rhyme or any other structural technique requires practise, discipline and imagination. Nobody just picks up a pen and writes a perfect piece of formal poetry -- but then, anyone who thinks they can just pick up a pen and write a perfect piece of free verse is kidding him/herself as well.

It's. All. Poetry.

/end rant
It could be worse
Reply
#2
I've found that the limited times I've used meter, it has pushed me to be more creative. Writing with meter feels different to me than with free verse. I always feel with meter I have a song in my head guiding the writing--words feel off in a way they don't in free verse. It's different but not worse at all.
The secret of poetry is cruelty.--Jon Anderson
Reply
#3
i ficking hate meter, that was an accidental typo Sad but i seriously hate it, i'm also not to keen on rhyme when it's got to be tied in to a set meter, but i only hate them because i find them hard; a chore or a task that i force myself to do. the truth is, when done properly they are beautiful things to behold. who can say they don't like Byron's "she walks in beauty"
when i use meter and rhyme i usually screw up...but i screw up less and less, or more and more depending on the technical side of it. but what i do get from it is a bit of satisfaction. the rhyming sestina i did wasn't great by a long shot and i should have paid more attention to the meter, but time made me rush in order to get a poem on the boards, but it was worth it, a bit of a gold medal really Big Grin doing made me realise that i have to pay more attention to detail. that i have to leave it a short while and look at it with fresh eyes before posting it. I should have spotted most if not all of the problems before i posted the thing. but that's one of the reason's why we have a workshop. i'm lazy by nature and doing such tasks (and it is a real task and not a labour of love) train me to be more vigilant, to take more notice of what i write. that transfers over to other forms i do enjoy such as Haiku (which often gets the same kid of ridicule as meter and rhyme) skill, craft or whatever you want to call it is something that can always be improved upon till it's time to lose your marbles. poetry craft is about poetry, not just non rhyming or non metered stuff. (free verse, not blank verse which does use meter) rhymes don't always come at the end of line, they can happen within a line, do we therefore shun internal rhyme? i do believe if you can't write a reasonable metered poem that rhymes, you'll probably have trouble writing a free verse poem. if you just don't like and don't want to write meter and rhymed poetry but can then fair dos but to dismiss it as shit underfoot seems a bit like an it guy dismissing the wheel
Reply
#4
taking what billy said, i think free verse does derive a bit from meter in the sense that in order to break the rules, you have to know what they are. i'm not usually fond of pieces that adhere to meter and strict exact rhymes (i love offrhymes personally, though people like my girlfriend--who doesn't like poetry much--only likes the blatant ones).

a rhyming poem without meter feels like it has no backbone to me; nothing to stop you from ending a line anytime you want. think of it as a sport; most of them have an out of bounds and that is what meter restricts your poem to. otherwise, the field goes on forever. things like enjambment and wordplay make it even more important
Written only for you to consider.
Reply
#5
internal rhythm helps the poem flow in most instances. and the rhymes can also be internal
if people don't like end rhyme. so i agree. Big Grin
Reply
#6
(08-05-2012, 08:44 AM)Leanne Wrote:  I've read a few comments around the traps lately, both here and on other sites (admittedly, mostly on other sites) that refer to meter as "rigid" and rhyme as "restrictive" or other similar terms.

This irritates me as I've never found either to be true, and the way rhyme and meter are spoken about by those who don't use them is quite derogatory. The term "old fashioned" gets thrown around a fair bit as well.

Every game has a set of rules.

When writing a song or a poem we are playing the word game. Goal: to come up with the most appropriate and efficient way to express the movie playing in our minds. To be restricted to certain word choices because of form, rhyme or meter requirements makes the game challenging and enjoyable. jmo
Reply
#7
https://www2.bc.edu/~richarad/lcb/wip/rc2.html

well, being mosty uneducated I dont know most of what he's on about but I do know that ill chosen Syntax in free verse can kill a poem for me. I find it harder to write free verse because of the need to be almost perfect in approach. right now Im in the mood to write buty have nothing to sperak off, so I will go hunting big game sites.. that always kills the mood, Eratosphere always makes me barf!
Perfection changes with the light and light goes on for infinity ~~~Bronte

Reply
#8
i agree, i read a lot of what he said but it sounded to perfect for me, too clinical.
i'm pretty much uneducated myself. i'd have thought syntax; be it poetry syntax or normal language syntax are pretty much the same, but even if they're not, they do have to do the job of syntax. to do other wise would ,make poetry and language in general a ball ache to read, and even comprehend. most languages have some kind of meter, or rhythm, i know the Philippine language does. if we can communicate, we can and often do so with the aid and use of meter.
funny how most songs use meter and often poetic form as well as rhythm and rhyme but everyone sings happily along and say ooooh and aaaaar. (sp) meter is inherent in the english language. isn't it?
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!