T.G.I.F. 11/29/19
#1
Hello! Welcome to T.G.I.F. 

What this is:  A new prompt will be posted every Friday-ish.  Everyone is welcome to participate in this thread at any time, no restrictions apply (newbies, you’re welcome to join in too!).  Don't overthink the prompts, just let loose and have a bit of fun.  

How it Works:   
1. Write a poem on the suggested topic using the form described.  (However, the prompt is more like guidelines, not a hard and fast rule.)
2. Each poem should appear as a separate reply to this thread.
3. The goal is to have FUN!!!   Comments, kudos, and questions are welcome responses.

Friday-ish, November 29, 2019

Topic: animals ... write a poem about an animal, or inspired by an animal, or from the point of view of an animal and/or etc.  

Form: any

Line Requirement:  any really, but let’s say 8ish as a point of reference.  
The Soufflé isn’t the soufflé; the soufflé is the recipe. --Clara 
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#2
Evenings at the park

I play ball
NOW!
You take me to park
I yelp as I go
jumpu doggu even
because I can't believe I play ball
NOW!
Oooooooooohhhhhhh the grass
Oooooooooohhhhhh the stones
Oooooooooohhhhhh some other doog has pooed
I examine it later, I can see
BALL IN AIR!

Gracefully it swirls, like pulled by the strings
of gravity, parabolic arc described by  y = x*tan(theta) - 0.5g*x^2/cos^2(theta)
unless you're correcting for relativity, or the variation of gravity with height, the calculation should be fine
assuming no air friction.
I am a sage when the ball is in the air,
at one with the minds of old...

IT FALL! I GRAB! What this... A HUSKY!!!
Raarff! Raarf!! I bite...DON'T TAKE MY BALL!

YIPEE.....MY HOOMAN THROW BALL IN AIR AGAIN...
I leap through the clean air, breathe in the spring
like dogs of long ago, traipsing through the thaw
with mastodons and men, 
huddling around the fire in the evening. Then the old gods came,
Anubis, Seth, then the....

IT FALL! I GRAB! What this... A HUSKY!!!
Raarff! Raarf!! I bite...DON'T TAKE MY BALL!
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#3
Black, White, and Red


A zebra can’t be ridden, for
a zebra can’t be broken.  It
will fight a rider to its death
hence sub-Saharan Africa
possessed no cavalry.

Just so, Jamestown planters found
they never could enslave
their native Indians, for those
would pine away and die before
becoming useful hands.

Eurasian horses, saddle-broken,
and black men of Africa,
enslaved, were living tools until
such ease accrued from ownership
that conscience dawned.

Now horses run for pleasure and
wild zebras roam protected veldts
while black men test their liberty
still fearing for its permanence
but Indians still pine.



Late, rough, and a superfluity of lines... but the poem about marmosets didn't work out.
feedback award Non-practicing atheist
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#4
(12-01-2019, 10:35 PM)dukealien Wrote:  Black, White, and Red


A zebra can’t be ridden, for
a zebra can’t be broken.  It
will fight a rider to its death
hence sub-Saharan Africa
possessed no cavalry.

Just so, Jamestown planters found
they never could enslave
their native Indians, for those
would pine away and die before
becoming useful hands.

Eurasian horses, saddle-broken,
and black men of Africa,
enslaved, were living tools until
such ease accrued from ownership
that conscience dawned.

Now horses run for pleasure and
wild zebras roam protected veldts
while black men test their liberty
still fearing for its permanence
but Indians still pine.



Late, rough, and a superfluity of lines... but the poem about marmosets didn't work out.

Interesting. However, selective breeding for desirable traits should lend any animal to domestication, more so pack animals, and non-predators (trial and error with a lion doesn't really appeal to most people). The question of why the zebra wasn't domesticated remains.

Eurasian horses can also be seen as the Irish, the Scots, and the working poor of Europe more generally. Nice.
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#5
(12-02-2019, 05:50 AM)busker Wrote:  
(12-01-2019, 10:35 PM)dukealien Wrote:  Black, White, and Red

Interesting. However, selective breeding for desirable traits should lend any animal to domestication, more so pack animals, and non-predators (trial and error with a lion doesn't really appeal to most people). The question of why the zebra wasn't domesticated remains.

Eurasian horses can also be seen as the Irish, the Scots, and the working poor of Europe more generally. Nice.

@busker - A little rushed, when the marmosets refused to cooperate.

As to horses vs. zebras, the problem may be one of vision: after seeing through the decoration to the basic shape, we fail to look beyond the shape to basic instinct. An unbroken horse goes nuts, but (usually) gets over it with appropriate treatment; a zebra doesn't get over it, ever. In my limited understanding of evolution, the survival situation might run something like this: when a lion jumps onto a zebra's back, death is clear and present, no point in holding back; there's also a degree of social protection since the chosen zebra can save others in the herd from serial slaughter by making the lion work for her kill. (Plus, a lioness is heavy and very sharp.) A horse on the plains of Asia, jumped by a wolf, can try bucking but its best tactic (given the wolf lacks a lion's fangs to penetrate its neck) may be to run like crazy, outdistance the wolf pack, then deal with the rider at leisure. Stretching the story, if the horse can reach its herd the other herd members' instinctive mode of fighting is to bite at the back of the neck - where the wolf happens to be clinging.

Just stories, of course - like a lot of evolutionary theory, especially in its early days. Glad you liked it.
feedback award Non-practicing atheist
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#6
my cat ginger, sly old bastard
purrs and fawns and fucks about
enticing me to play his play
he'll roll and jump on cuddly mouse

and other tragic toys around the house.

he'll nibble kibble in between and when I rest
he'll pounce unseen; sit on my head, then bat my face
with claws extended, zero grace, he'll rake my skin
and lacerate a cheek or jowl and then he'll grin
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#7
The spider is such an awkward thing,
with her head full of eyes and her ass full of string.
She kindly eats the pesky fly
and in return we bid her die.  
We call her web a work of art
then sweep a broom and tear it apart.
She wants only to live with us symbiotically 
yet we fear her and hunt her down pathologically.
The spider is such an awkward thing,
with her head full of eyes and her ass full of string.
The Soufflé isn’t the soufflé; the soufflé is the recipe. --Clara 
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#8
Billy - that’s why you should get a dog
Quixillated - Ass full of sting? I thought they used jaws :-p

Could we please have the prompts on a Friday and not on a Saturday? Don’t bring time zones into this, there is only one that’s authentic, and everybody knows which one (Eastern Australia).
This is for you, Sir Quixillated.. Chop chop.
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#9
Ha the sting was a typo, now corrected. Thumbsup

As for punctuality Hysterical ... they often aren’t even posted on MY time zone’s Friday. There’s no way I could keep track of all the Fridays nor could I make each Friday sit in chronological order.  I did entertain the idea of posting it when Friday begins in Kiritimati, but then I realized it’s me posting so it’s going to posted at completely random times no matter whose Friday it is.   If you need the prompts to be punctual, you would have to take over the duty of posting them.  I’m not even always aware that it IS Friday until it’s almost Saturday.    Wink
The Soufflé isn’t the soufflé; the soufflé is the recipe. --Clara 
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