Endjambent?
#21
(06-01-2013, 05:44 AM)Leanne Wrote:  
(05-31-2013, 09:56 PM)bogpan Wrote:  (Though enjambment is a concept introduced by the French)

Well actually, it's been used as a deliberate technique for more than 3000 years -- the French can't just stick a new name on it and claim it as their own. Honestly, the Gaul of some people!
Ha, ha, by this logic we can get to the beginning of the world or there is nothing new under the sun. Oh, Baudelaire!
'Because the barbarians will arrive today;and they get bored with eloquence and orations.' CP Cavafy
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#22
(06-01-2013, 05:44 AM)Leanne Wrote:  
(05-31-2013, 09:56 PM)bogpan Wrote:  (Though enjambment is a concept introduced by the French)

Well actually, it's been used as a deliberate technique for more than 3000 years -- the French can't just stick a new name on it and claim it as their own. Honestly, the Gaul of some people!

Well, in a way, the French are correct as the location of the
Chauvet Cave is in southern France. If you look at this 30,000
year old cave painting you can clearly see a break in the
syntactic unit after the third horse from left:

[Image: chauvet_horses.jpg]

Of course France's claim is a bit broad because the painters,
technically, weren't French, they were Aurignacian.


(06-02-2013, 04:12 PM)bogpan Wrote:  Ha, ha, by this logic we can get to the beginning of the world or there is nothing new under the sun. Oh, Baudelaire!

New thing under the sun: I have this plastic* kitchen gadget. When I
enjamb an egg into it, it makes a cube-shaped egg. I doubt that not
even Mr. No-New-Thing (aka King Solomon) in all his glory had one of these.

*Plastic, BTW, is another new thing. And my cats (especially Bastet) are
new. And that yellow stuff you use to keep bats from squeaking, that's
definitely new.

almost terse
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#23
(06-03-2013, 11:05 PM)rayheinrich Wrote:  
(06-01-2013, 05:44 AM)Leanne Wrote:  
(05-31-2013, 09:56 PM)bogpan Wrote:  (Though enjambment is a concept introduced by the French)

Well actually, it's been used as a deliberate technique for more than 3000 years -- the French can't just stick a new name on it and claim it as their own. Honestly, the Gaul of some people!

Well, in a way, the French are correct as the location of the
Chauvet Cave is in southern France. If you look at this 30,000
year old cave painting you can clearly see a break in the
syntactic unit after the third horse from left:

[Image: chauvet_horses.jpg]

Of course France's claim is a bit broad because the painters,
technically, weren't French, they were Aurignacian.


(06-02-2013, 04:12 PM)bogpan Wrote:  Ha, ha, by this logic we can get to the beginning of the world or there is nothing new under the sun. Oh, Baudelaire!

New thing under the sun: I have this plastic* kitchen gadget. When I
enjamb an egg into it, it makes a cube-shaped egg. I doubt that not
even Mr. No-New-Thing (aka King Solomon) in all his glory had one of these.

*Plastic, BTW, is another new thing. And my cats (especially Bastet) are
new. And that yellow stuff you use to keep bats from squeaking, that's
definitely new.


I am amazed at this plastic device that holds the liquid of an egg in suspension enough strongly enough to make specific shapes.

The world is truly an amazing place!
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#24
(06-04-2013, 05:46 AM)milo Wrote:  I am amazed at this plastic device that holds the liquid of an egg in suspension enough strongly enough to make specific shapes.

The world is truly an amazing place!


Its trick is to square the egg AFTER it's been cooked, thereby getting
around the yolk suspension problem.

[Image: egg-cuber-makes-square-eggs-3.jpg]



A beggar approached Saki as he was sitting in a cafe. Instead of asking for money immediately, he approached the subject in a roundabout way. He claimed that he was a victim of the war. In times of peace, he had been prosperous, but the war had ruined him.

His prosperity was due to a successful experiment that he conducted. He had always thought that eggs would be better if they were not so round. One day, he noticed that one of his aunt's hens regularly laid eggs that were somewhat angular. He searched the markets for other hens with similar characteristics. When he found one, he bought it and brought it back to the village of Verchey-les-Torteaux, where he lived. By skillful breeding, he produced a race of hens that laid eggs that would not roll, even though you pushed it.

He found it easy to sell his novel eggs. At first, people bought them out of curiosity. Eventually their practical convenience became widely known, and he was able to sell his eggs above market price.

He made sure that his monopoly on square eggs would continue indefinitely. He did not sell any of his hens, and he sterilized the eggs before he sold them.

Then the war came, and he had to fight at the front. His aunt carried on the square egg business, but she kept all the profits for himself. She claimed that since she cared for the hens and sold the eggs, the money should be hers.

Since the business was his, he felt that he could force his aunt to give him the profits if he could take the matter to court, but he did not have enough money to file a case. He then asked Saki to lend him a small sum so that he could prosecute his suit.

Saki said he would go to Verchey-les-Torteaux and inspect the square-egg hen farm, if he got a few days leave. Since the beggar was telling a tall tale, he did not care to pursue the conversation any further. However, to be polite, he asked Saki what he would do if he found that the farm was indeed producing square eggs.

Saki replied that he would marry the aunt.
--------------

From: "The Collected Stories of Saki" by Hector Hugh Munro
almost terse
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#25
(06-07-2013, 10:20 PM)rayheinrich Wrote:  
(06-04-2013, 05:46 AM)milo Wrote:  I am amazed at this plastic device that holds the liquid of an egg in suspension enough strongly enough to make specific shapes.

The world is truly an amazing place!


Its trick is to square the egg AFTER it's been cooked, thereby getting
around the yolk suspension problem.

[Image: egg-cuber-makes-square-eggs-3.jpg]



A beggar approached Saki as he was sitting in a cafe. Instead of asking for money immediately, he approached the subject in a roundabout way. He claimed that he was a victim of the war. In times of peace, he had been prosperous, but the war had ruined him.

His prosperity was due to a successful experiment that he conducted. He had always thought that eggs would be better if they were not so round. One day, he noticed that one of his aunt's hens regularly laid eggs that were somewhat angular. He searched the markets for other hens with similar characteristics. When he found one, he bought it and brought it back to the village of Verchey-les-Torteaux, where he lived. By skillful breeding, he produced a race of hens that laid eggs that would not roll, even though you pushed it.

He found it easy to sell his novel eggs. At first, people bought them out of curiosity. Eventually their practical convenience became widely known, and he was able to sell his eggs above market price.

He made sure that his monopoly on square eggs would continue indefinitely. He did not sell any of his hens, and he sterilized the eggs before he sold them.

Then the war came, and he had to fight at the front. His aunt carried on the square egg business, but she kept all the profits for himself. She claimed that since she cared for the hens and sold the eggs, the money should be hers.

Since the business was his, he felt that he could force his aunt to give him the profits if he could take the matter to court, but he did not have enough money to file a case. He then asked Saki to lend him a small sum so that he could prosecute his suit.

Saki said he would go to Verchey-les-Torteaux and inspect the square-egg hen farm, if he got a few days leave. Since the beggar was telling a tall tale, he did not care to pursue the conversation any further. However, to be polite, he asked Saki what he would do if he found that the farm was indeed producing square eggs.

Saki replied that he would marry the aunt.
--------------

From: "The Collected Stories of Saki" by Hector Hugh Munro

ahhh . . . I thought you said square eggs but you meant /cubed/ eggs. That clears everything up for they are quite common in some parts of the world . . .
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#26
I believe we're actually looking at a 2 dimensional image that gives one the illusion of looking at cubed eggs.
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#27
2 dimensional images that are square are even more common than cubed eggs. It is what the image is /of/ that is of interest. If you can't tell (due to perspective or what not) try reading the box.

do try to keep up
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#28
Opposing enjambment is square.
It could be worse
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#29
(06-08-2013, 04:25 PM)Leanne Wrote:  Opposing enjambment is square.

Such a reflexive answer!

Opposing endjamberments are obtuse.

[Image: angle-obtuse-vs-reflex.gif]

almost terse
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#30
Bump for Don Q

andhttp://www.pigpenpoetry.com/thread-4299.html
billy wrote:welcome to the site. make it your own, wear it like a well loved slipper and wear it out. ella pleads:please click forum titles for posting guidelines, important threads. New poet? Try Poetic DevicesandWard's Tips

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#31
When typing in Word, it automatically enjambs when you reach the end of the line. Sometimes the first and last words matter less than the length, if everything matters.
Peanut butter honey banana sandwiches
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#32
(06-29-2017, 09:47 AM)CRNDLSM Wrote:  When typing in Word, it automatically enjambs when you reach the end of the line. Sometimes the first and last words matter less than the length, if everything matters.
I think that in poetry we'd probably prefer to think of enjambment as a deliberate device, rather than an accidental exposure to Bill Gates and his formatting whims.

(06-29-2017, 09:47 AM)CRNDLSM Wrote:  Sometimes the first and last words matter less than the length, if everything matters.
This doesn't sound like you're even referring to poetry...
It could be worse
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#33
                [Image: enjambment.jpg]
                                        [Image: enjambment2.jpg]
almost terse
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