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The Guardian:
You thought it was the equivalence of energy and mass
I’d say you’re an arse
if you haven’t by now struck a line through the “c”
(at least mentally),
so that it reads properly, as it ought to,
“E = Me2”.

The Telegraph:
Me too, me too, sang the floundering crew
of the Titanic, when the boats were rationed out,
but they were made of sterner stuff (no doubt)
than the unicorn liberal, powder puff, lout.

The Australian, mysteriously American:
You should thank your stars Donald Trump is President,
Christ’s in his throne, no alien’s resident,
for if by now it isn’t evident 
that a nation is built on the right of the individual to bear arms, even automatics and death rays,
please read what the second amendment says.
I don't see a problem with movements that spread awareness of harmful activities and ways to prevent them. I seem to have a problem with a large group of people gathering to stand or sit around agreeing with each other. It offends my sensitivities.

Also, these kinds of groups make me nervous, whatever their politics or agendas are. I don't think I make them nervous, but I think they think that I think that I make them nervous, and that makes me nervous. And once nervous I begin to behave in a way that makes them nervous, which adds more to the general discomfort. But that's just me.

Or to put it more plainly, I think I've got on people's nerves or made them nervous for so long that their nerves are going to start a movement to take me down.

That the Trump supporters and gun-owners and women, well women in general, and the news papers are all going to join together for this common cause. So I have to watch what I say and how I act from now on.
Putting a line through the c is a clever bit. Smile
(12-21-2018, 03:48 AM)rowens Wrote: [ -> ]I don't see a problem with movements that spread awareness of harmful activities and ways to prevent them. I seem to have a problem with a large group of people gathering to stand or sit around agreeing with each other. It offends my sensitivities.

Also, these kinds of groups make me nervous, whatever their politics or agendas are. I don't think I make them nervous, but I think they think that I think that I make them nervous, and that makes me nervous. And once nervous I begin to behave in a way that makes them nervous, which adds more to the general discomfort. But that's just me.

Or to put it more plainly, I think I've got on people's nerves or made them nervous for so long that their nerves are going to start a movement to take me down.

That the Trump supporters and gun-owners and women, well women in general, and the news papers are all going to join together for this common cause. So I have to watch what I say and how I act from now on.
is it just now, or hasn't it always been this way? as a kid, i always had to watch out, in case i was sinning against god, or being blind (as i often was) to social norms and such. and though i have a greater sense of freedom about myself, that freedom stops the moment i step up to someone, ask them how to commute to Eastwood Mall. it may have been social anxiety, or it may have been that i was yet learning how to live with the spectrum, but i don't think either of those made it any less true -- only made me more sensitive to that old adage, 'Hell is other people'. Which, I just learned by reading through the wiki article on Sartre, was also a dig on the Nazi occupation of Paris.

my reaction to the poem is the same. I'm Filipino, heterosexual, male, middle class, and generally a pacifist. i don't really have a stake in any of these issues. but my older sister did note that she was affected by #metoo in a good way, as she recalled a very awkward circumstance involving some creep in a bus. so i get where they're coming from, and think that a little patience regarding the movement would go a long way.

less so with gun control, because the statistics behind that are a little colder, and the demands of the NRA considerably more unreasonable. so in the end, i read this poem as a joke. but at whose expense, i don't know -- there's only so many things i can have patience for.
I think the American government and the NRA and people who shoot people should have a summit discussing their feelings and their childhood memories. . . . And as for the other thing: How come there are no women creeps? Why can't I ever get felt up on the subway or have someone coming on to me in a bar? And the other thing, it's a new world of technology, so whenever I make a social blunder, which is all the time, I never know when a group of people with cameras are going to bust out of the wall saying, ''See, look at what this guy just did. That's a perfect example of what we're talking about you shouldn't do.''
I read this and found very knowledgeable...