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A young cashier in hijab
rings up cases of kosher wine,
smiles "Happy Holiday"—
"You, too."
That's sweet.
And in the true spirit of capitalism: Why keep someone out when you can hire them for minimum wage?

(And... not that I'm worried or anything, but how many cases do you usually buy at one time? ... no, don't answer that, didn't mean to pry.)
(04-02-2017, 11:48 PM)rayheinrich Wrote: [ -> ]That's sweet.
And in the true spirit of capitalism: Why keep someone out when you can hire them for minimum wage?
Don't worry, the rest of the employees showed no sign of religious preference and, based on recent results, most likely voted Republican.

Quote:(And... not that I'm worried or anything, but how many cases do you usually buy at one time? ... no, don't answer that, didn't mean to pry.)

Did you miss the holiday part? All but atheists (and maybe them, I don't know) have large gatherings in early spring, cabin fever and all that, yanno.

And who said I bought the wine? Big Grin
(04-03-2017, 12:12 AM)ellajam Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-02-2017, 11:48 PM)rayheinrich Wrote: [ -> ](And... not that I'm worried or anything, but how many cases do you usually buy at one time? ... no, don't answer that, didn't mean to pry.)

Did you miss the holiday part? All but atheists (and maybe them, I don't know) have large gatherings in early spring, cabin fever and all that, yanno.

To hear it from the Baptists down here in The Belt, the only time atheists have large gatherings is when they're sacrificing virgins or eating Christian babies... the usual.

Find list of probable human sacrifice dates here.
Note: Satanic holiday dates change annually according to the regular calendar and differ from cult to cult, so be sure to ask first.


(04-03-2017, 12:12 AM)ellajam Wrote: [ -> ]And who said I bought the wine? Big Grin

A non-denial denial if I ever heard one.
(04-02-2017, 11:32 PM)ellajam Wrote: [ -> ]A young cashier in hijab
rings up cases of kosher wine,
smiles "Happy Holiday"—
"You, too."

Bleh, Manischewitz. Good dash metaphor usage. You too meaning they share some things and whatnot.
Thanks, Brownlie, i don't use the dash often, glad it works. But no Mani — Pinot G, Zin and Cab, it's a big world out there. Big Grin
(04-02-2017, 11:32 PM)ellajam Wrote: [ -> ]A young cashier in hijab
rings up cases of kosher wine,
smiles "Happy Holiday"—
"You, too."
"cases of kosher wine" implies that the customer is capable of buying so much drink, ie is a class above that of the cashier, who considering the usual policies of shoprite receives a salary barely above minimum wage -- now here it is implied that the division between religions/nations is respected, which is good, but also the division between classes, which is not necessarily good, considering the growing mobocratic/oligarchic tyranny of the rich, and the growing divide between the rich and the poor, and thus the need for the lower class to recognize their position in and importance to the world. also, shoprite is a particularly western institution -- does the speaker mean to say that this piece can only be found in, worse still can only be achieved by, a western institution? the same institution that destroyed the middle east with its imperialist policies, and forced zionism into certain logical extremes with its general anti-semitism? this piece revels in western, middle class blindness --------- and of course i lol very much at this rather ridiculous interpretation, particularly because i just went through a quick google search to even figure out what shoprite is, and thus probably missed a lot of juicy details. but yeah, the em dash is effective -- i don't really see anything to change here, not unless you consider the above comment seriously.
Interesting take on it, River. I can definitely see how you came to your interpretation and I think you've come to some valid conclusions, even though they are very different from mine. First, you're not the only one who thinks minimum wage jobs are oppressive. I and everyone I know has had some of them while in school or while figuring out how to make more money. Supermarket jobs tend to have flexible shifts that put at least part of living expenses into the pockets of students, they let highschoolers save for first cars and college kids eat.

It may just be in the US but people of all religions tend to spend excessively on their holidays. Families tend to gather in quantity, coming together even though they might not at other times. Festive meals are huge with drink to match, regardless of class. Poor people go into debt for them, I'm not saying that's good, just true. Personally when I buy wine I'll pick up 6 varied bottles and they'll last at least a month. The large quantities were recognizable to the cashier as readying for a celebration of ancient traditions, of which she clearly has her own or she wouldn't have her headcovering. I don't think the two parties saw themselves as different classes, I doubt they are.

And to top it off, when it seems half of the US would like the world to mimic Hitler's version, I find a crumb of comfort  in every encounter (taken part of or observed) when people live their everyday lives with respect for each other.
These little moments are a blessing.
Then I read too much into the poem.
I wondered if they had a shared moment where each had their own holiday.
I don't know much about either culture/religion.
I love when folks can get along, that's for sure!
I smelled a spice when I read it, strange.
What is that spice? I like it! Maybe allspice...
Thanks for the read!
(04-02-2017, 11:32 PM)ellajam Wrote: [ -> ]A young cashier in hijab
rings up cases of kosher wine,
smiles "Happy Holiday"—
"You, too."

I spent a few days trying to think of something to critique. 
You even put "smiles", otherwise I would have asked how the cashier felt.
Otherwise, I'll keep thinking about it. And thinking. Smile
The best thing I can fork up is "What about atheists", but that's dumb. 
I didn't get oppression. Maybe it is, but for all we know, you've been saving up all year for the holidays.
Here, the dialogue suggests equality. (I don't believe equality is possible, but that's an opinion).
So far, so good! This is a pleasant escape from all the cynicism choking the masses.