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"A rainbow"
ha! very funny, Ray G. Biv...  Big Grin

just mercedes

wet ...

just mercedes

[Image: 522052_613347158693725_1350198251_n.jpg?...cbcff49fce]
(02-12-2015, 06:21 AM)just mercedes Wrote: [ -> ][Image: bigtoad.jpg]


Toad dreams
- Marge Piercy

That afternoon the dream of the toads rang through the elms by Little River and
affected the thoughts of men, though they were not conscious that they heard it.

--Henry Thoreau


The dream of toads: we rarely
credit what we consider lesser
life with emotions big as ours,
but we are easily distracted,
abstracted. People sit nibbling
before television's flicker watching
ghosts chase balls and each other
while the skunk is out risking grisly
death to cross the highway to mate;
while the fox scales the wire fence
where it knows the shotgun lurks
to taste the sweet blood of a hen.
Birds are greedy little bombs
bursting to give voice to appetite.
I had a cat who died of love.
Dogs trail their masters across con-
tinents. We are far too busy
to be starkly simple in passion.
We will never dream the intense
wet spring lust of the toads.
It takes two to carry a master toad,
dead weight in his serenity
his bulbous girth a slippery load.
Through slitted lids he still can see
that he's not moving on his own;
a sliver of you and a sliver of me
joined as one to form his throne.
(02-13-2015, 06:40 AM)ellajam Wrote: [ -> ]It takes two to carry a master toad,
dead weight in his serenity
his bulbous girth a slippery load.
Through slitted lids he still can see
that he's not moving on his own;
a sliver of you and a sliver of me
joined as one to form his throne.

That's so beautiful I feel embarrassed (a bit like Adam and Eve*).

Not that I know, but doesn't the 'moistness' make she/he seem more like a frog?

Vis-à-vis Adam's and Eve's embarrassment:


   God was testing them & itself. God is the snake, tree, nature, adam, eve, everything. God is playing hide 'n' seek with itself.

   God tells Adam that he is free to eat from any tree in the garden, but he must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. When Eve and Adam disobey, and eat of that fruit, they are expelled from the garden. There is a (family of concepts)= "Concepts are Illusions" here that is different from what we meet in Greek philosophy. God is setting up a kind of covenant by which humans will be blessed if they obey the commands God gives them. Human disobedience is not explained in the text, except that the serpent=God says to Eve that they will not die if they eat the fruit, but will be like Divine God, (knowing good and evil), and Eve sees the fruit as good for food and (pleasing) to the eye and (desirable) for gaining wisdom. After they eat, Adam and Eve know that they are naked, and are (ashamed), and hide from God. There is a turning away from God and from obedience to God that characterizes this as a ‘fall into sin’. As the story goes on, and Cain kills Abel, evil spreads to all the people of the earth, and Genesis describes the basic state as a corruption of the heart . This idea of a basic orientation away from or towards God and God's commands becomes in the Patristic period of early Christianity the idea of a will. There is no such idea in Plato or Aristotle, and no Greek word that the English word ‘will’ properly translates.

   Now that we know the tale of the "concept" story. It is all an illusion anyway~ enjoy life.

- written by "Hidden Hand" 21-1-2012

Ha, thanks, Ray, I'll see you and raise you one blush. It was the combo of Mercedes' pic with the Thoreau quote under it and Marge's stab at it what wrote it.

Will and the balance of relinquishing and taking responsibility for it is always interesting to mull over.

just mercedes

I have to write a poem called The Dream of The Toads.
(02-13-2015, 02:57 PM)just mercedes Wrote: [ -> ]I have to write a poem called The Dream of The Toads.

Wonderful title.

Reminds me of:

A toad came down the walk:
He did not know I saw;
He bit an angle-worm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw.

And then he drank a dew
From a convenient grass,
And then hopped sidewise to the wall
To let a beetle pass.

He glanced with rapid eyes
That hurried all abroad,-
They looked like frightened beads, I thought;
He stirred his glisteny head

Like one in danger; cautious,
I offered him a crumb,
And he unrolled his tongue
And rowed him softer home

Than oars divide the ocean,
Too silver for a seam,
Or butterflies, off banks of noon,
Leap, plashless, as they swim.



                - Ylime Nosnikcid