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writing from brazil, south america.

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i was raised with english as a second language through popular music and popular cinema.

i didn't realize i was getting in anglo-world for that happens so naturally - though my friends when i was a kid hated english classes with all their strenght.

i think my friends had a symbolic view of english as a meaningless world cry, coming through; like a bullet; hip hop riot; literally a "rock"; it doesn't matter what it says , they said. they're actually could be cursing your mother.

than i used to write emails in english to a french girl for a couple of years but i never been really in correspondance with anyone "out there ".

so that happened to me to live with english as a a selfish language and i'm not sure that makes senses to much people. makes senses in my head;

that even make more senses than the native one, and makes more senses as I put every word on it; like a pound poem; full of draws.

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in brazil we actually make use of two-languages; portuguese in writing, brazilian dialects in conversation, which came from XVI Th century portuguese, tupi-guarany forms, ioruba, and a couple of english words that are falling today.

rowens

You mean that English seems like a language of hateful people that more often than not are cursing someone's mother? Or your friends think that: While you're interested in the so-called Seattle scene of the '90s and the '60s of the '60s?
(06-26-2014, 06:59 AM)rowens Wrote: [ -> ]You mean that English seems like a language of hateful people that more often than not are cursing someone's mother? Or your friends think that: While you're interested in the so-called Seattle scene of the '90s and the '60s of the '60s?



no, in the 90's, when i was a kid, that was a kind of cliché amongst the kids; "you listen to songs in english, you don't even know what they are talking about, they may be cursing you and your mother"; i remember heat this being said many times;


in those days north-american or british rock music was a gang thing, much identified with a specific group of teenagers; rockers, as opposed to other groups with other tastes

rowens

When I was in the '90s people said the same thing to me about what they were saying in rock music. Weird Al Yankovic made a song about it where he had marbles in his mouth.
English isn't my second language, although some might think it is in how poorly I use it, but I learned it the same way as you, only from inside of the culture, not from the outside looking in. A lot of English is idiomatic, and I spoke mostly in the idioms of my generation, with maybe a few connecting words, or explaining words tossed in here and there. Today I think it is worse. It is still just as idiomatic, only there are less idioms, which are just repeated more...but that makes it easier to text.


dale
i only know english so can't really make a distinction as it's the only one i've known. as such i've never noticed too many faults with it apart from not actually understanding it :J:
I enjoy the way people type english in india and south africa. Don't get a word but, its funny.

There is no indian or south african in here?
I'm Canadian, so I took about 6 years of french class in school and hated every second of it. I can speak some simple phrases and ask some questions, but I couldn't have a conversation in French. Most of my friends also hated french class, but it wasn't forced onto us through popular culture, like English is in other parts of the world.

Looking back, I wish I had paid more attention and actually tried to learn a little french. I do think most of the fault lies in the way they tried to teach us however; it was way too formal, focusing on little details like verb conjugation, male/female words etc. If they had focused more on conversational french (just knowing words and stuff), it would have been much more useful. I don't care if I would have sounded like an idiot when I spoke french, as long as I could understand what other people were trying to say, and others could get the jist of what I was trying to say.

In grade 10 I took a conversational Spanish course for one semester, and I learnt pretty much as much Spanish in that one semester as I learned in 6 years of French class.
(07-01-2014, 04:24 AM)Wjames Wrote: [ -> ]I'm Canadian, so I took about 6 years of french class in school and hated every second of it. I can speak some simple phrases and ask some questions, but I couldn't have a conversation in French. Most of my friends also hated french class, but it wasn't forced onto us through popular culture, like English is in other parts of the world.

Looking back, I wish I had paid more attention and actually tried to learn a little french. I do think most of the fault lies in the way they tried to teach us however; it was way too formal, focusing on little details like verb conjugation, male/female words etc. If they had focused more on conversational french (just knowing words and stuff), it would have been much more useful. I don't care if I would have sounded like an idiot when I spoke french, as long as I could understand what other people were trying to say, and others could get the jist of what I was trying to say.

In grade 10 I took a conversational Spanish course for one semester, and I learnt pretty much as much Spanish in that one semester as I learned in 6 years of French class.


that sounds weird for me as long as there is a french Canada ;

it is very strange how political issues interferes on language so that two cultures can divides one country without get in any touch.