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travis.reeder

I want to start using a better vocabulary in my everyday life, as well in the few works that I have started writing. That being said, I want this discussion board to contain any unusual words, their definition and pronounciation, and a sentence or two (with imagery and feeling) on how it could be used in creative writing. I want this to not only be inspiring to myself, but also to other writers, so please keep that in mind when posting.


I'll start this off:

Tacenda
english
origin: latin
(n.) things better left unsaid; matters to be passed over in silence
Pronounciation | ta-'chen-da

A Tacenda passed between us; a thousand words brimming at our tongues, yet each other knew better than to speak the million bitter truths that lie ahead.
Great idea!
I love this thread already.

travis.reeder

Adoxography
(n.) beautiful writing on a subject of little or no importance
Pronounciation | a-doks-'o-graf-E

The words spewing forth from his fingertips were pure adoxography, and yet he pondered if anyone would care to read them, even five minutes from the present time.
(02-24-2014, 06:35 AM)travis.reeder Wrote: [ -> ]I want to start using a better vocabulary in my everyday life, as well in the few works that I have started writing. That being said, I want this discussion board to contain any unusual words, their definition and pronounciation, and a sentence or two (with imagery and feeling) on how it could be used in creative writing. I want this to not only be inspiring to myself, but also to other writers, so please keep that in mind when posting.


I'll start this off:

Tacenda
english
origin: latin
(n.) things better left unsaid; matters to be passed over in silence
Pronounciation | ta-'chen-da

A Tacenda passed between us; a thousand words brimming at our tongues, yet each other knew better than to speak the million bitter truths that lie ahead.
Malapropism

travis.reeder

Apodyopsis
english
origin: greek
(v.) The act of mentally undressing someone;
Imagining someone naked
Pronunciation | ap-O-dI-'op-sis

Cafuné
Portuguese
origin: germanic
(v.) the act of running ones fingers through anothers hair, specifically a lover.
Pronunciation | ka-'fU-nA (ka-foo-nay)


The moment he was looking forward to the most was the apodyopsis that they seemed to share when they together; the longing, lustful look of pure, relentless desire. She bites her lip from the corner, he stares longingly into her eyes, and a quick cafuné with a slight affectionate trace along the ear...and it happens; souls connect and what follows is nothing but pure ecstasy on the highest level.

(02-24-2014, 10:30 AM)Brownlie Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-24-2014, 06:35 AM)travis.reeder Wrote: [ -> ]I want to start using a better vocabulary in my everyday life, as well in the few works that I have started writing. That being said, I want this discussion board to contain any unusual words, their definition and pronounciation, and a sentence or two (with imagery and feeling) on how it could be used in creative writing. I want this to not only be inspiring to myself, but also to other writers, so please keep that in mind when posting.


I'll start this off:

Tacenda
english
origin: latin
(n.) things better left unsaid; matters to be passed over in silence
Pronounciation | ta-'chen-da

A Tacenda passed between us; a thousand words brimming at our tongues, yet each other knew better than to speak the million bitter truths that lie ahead.
Malapropism

Please refer to the above guidlines when posting
Thumbsup
pulchritude
noun

Beauty or attractiveness

From the Latin pulchritudo

The poultry's pulchritude is lacking, today.

And there I was, lying on the floor with a broken nose, even after I told her that I admired her for her inexpressable pulchritude!
(02-24-2014, 10:45 AM)travis.reeder Wrote: [ -> ]Apodyopsis
english
origin: greek
(v.) The act of mentally undressing someone;
Imagining someone naked
Pronunciation | ap-O-dI-'op-sis

Cafuné
Portuguese
origin: germanic
(v.) the act of running ones fingers through anothers hair, specifically a lover.
Pronunciation | ka-'fU-nA (ka-foo-nay)


The moment he was looking forward to the most was the apodyopsis that they seemed to share when they together; the longing, lustful look of pure, relentless desire. She bites her lip from the corner, he stares longingly into her eyes, and a quick cafuné with a slight affectionate trace along the ear...and it happens; souls connect and what follows is nothing but pure ecstasy on the highest level.

Please refer to the above guidlines when posting
Thumbsup

According to your definitions, apodyopsis and cafuné are both verbs. Yet you used the first like a noun. I'm confused.
(02-25-2014, 03:29 AM)justcloudy Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-24-2014, 10:45 AM)travis.reeder Wrote: [ -> ]Apodyopsis
english
origin: greek
(v.) The act of mentally undressing someone;
Imagining someone naked
Pronunciation | ap-O-dI-'op-sis

Cafuné
Portuguese
origin: germanic
(v.) the act of running ones fingers through anothers hair, specifically a lover.
Pronunciation | ka-'fU-nA (ka-foo-nay)


The moment he was looking forward to the most was the apodyopsis that they seemed to share when they together; the longing, lustful look of pure, relentless desire. She bites her lip from the corner, he stares longingly into her eyes, and a quick cafuné with a slight affectionate trace along the ear...and it happens; souls connect and what follows is nothing but pure ecstasy on the highest level.

Please refer to the above guidlines when posting
Thumbsup

According to your definitions, apodyopsis and cafuné are both verbs. Yet you used the first like a noun. I'm confused.

I am stricken with apodyopsis, but I am managing well with my handicap!
(02-25-2014, 03:42 AM)ChristopherSea Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-25-2014, 03:29 AM)justcloudy Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-24-2014, 10:45 AM)travis.reeder Wrote: [ -> ]Apodyopsis
english
origin: greek
(v.) The act of mentally undressing someone;
Imagining someone naked
Pronunciation | ap-O-dI-'op-sis

Cafuné
Portuguese
origin: germanic
(v.) the act of running ones fingers through anothers hair, specifically a lover.
Pronunciation | ka-'fU-nA (ka-foo-nay)
Fungible....as you might expect.
Plangent...as you might not.
borborygmi...as you ought to be A w air.
Taprogge...of no import whatsoever. But a good thing to know.
Oh for godness sake, look them up yourself...the better to fix them in your memorySmile
tectak


The moment he was looking forward to the most was the apodyopsis that they seemed to share when they together; the longing, lustful look of pure, relentless desire. She bites her lip from the corner, he stares longingly into her eyes, and a quick cafuné with a slight affectionate trace along the ear...and it happens; souls connect and what follows is nothing but pure ecstasy on the highest level.

Please refer to the above guidlines when posting
Thumbsup

According to your definitions, apodyopsis and cafuné are both verbs. Yet you used the first like a noun. I'm confused.
I am stricken with apodyopsis, but I am managing well with my handicap!

travis.reeder

(02-25-2014, 03:29 AM)justcloudy Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-24-2014, 10:45 AM)travis.reeder Wrote: [ -> ]Apodyopsis
english
origin: greek
(v.) The act of mentally undressing someone;
Imagining someone naked
Pronunciation | ap-O-dI-'op-sis

Cafuné
Portuguese
origin: germanic
(v.) the act of running ones fingers through anothers hair, specifically a lover.
Pronunciation | ka-'fU-nA (ka-foo-nay)


The moment he was looking forward to the most was the apodyopsis that they seemed to share when they together; the longing, lustful look of pure, relentless desire. She bites her lip from the corner, he stares longingly into her eyes, and a quick cafuné with a slight affectionate trace along the ear...and it happens; souls connect and what follows is nothing but pure ecstasy on the highest level.

Please refer to the above guidlines when posting
Thumbsup

According to your definitions, apodyopsis and cafuné are both verbs. Yet you used the first like a noun. I'm confused.

I believe it can also be used as a verbal noun; it's kind of a complex word to try to use eloquently, and I apologize for the confusion. I am learning to use these words as well as others
(02-25-2014, 06:42 AM)travis.reeder Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-25-2014, 03:29 AM)justcloudy Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-24-2014, 10:45 AM)travis.reeder Wrote: [ -> ]Apodyopsis
english
origin: greek
(v.) The act of mentally undressing someone;
Imagining someone naked
Pronunciation | ap-O-dI-'op-sis

Cafuné
Portuguese
origin: germanic
(v.) the act of running ones fingers through anothers hair, specifically a lover.
Pronunciation | ka-'fU-nA (ka-foo-nay)


The moment he was looking forward to the most was the apodyopsis that they seemed to share when they together; the longing, lustful look of pure, relentless desire. She bites her lip from the corner, he stares longingly into her eyes, and a quick cafuné with a slight affectionate trace along the ear...and it happens; souls connect and what follows is nothing but pure ecstasy on the highest level.

Please refer to the above guidlines when posting
Thumbsup

According to your definitions, apodyopsis and cafuné are both verbs. Yet you used the first like a noun. I'm confused.

I believe it can also be used as a verbal noun; it's kind of a complex word to try to use eloquently, and I apologize for the confusion. I am learning to use these words as well as others

well, the definition is "the act of . . ." which means it would have to be a noun (as every other act of) and the word ends in "-opsis" which would mean it is a noun like every other "-opsis" word. I believe whatever site did the definition got the grammar particle wrong.

http://nws.merriam-webster.com/opendicti...Ap&last=10

your usage of Cafuné would make that a noun as well btw.
Die Walküre: Ring of the Nibelung

Nibelung: any of a race of dwarfs who possessed a treasure captured by Siegfried. origin German/Teutonic


I just think Wagner is under-appreciated.

rowens

Pronounciation is an unusual looking word.
Unusual Words

Farctate may be my favorite for now.
(02-25-2014, 11:08 AM)newsclippings Wrote: [ -> ]Unusual Words

Farctate may be my favorite for now.

Oh my, you can feel the gas pain in that word!

There was a time when antidisestablishmentarianism was the longest word that I knew, but it doesn't measure up to hippopotomonstrosesquipedalian!

Can anyone use these two in a fixed-meter poem?
wikionary Wrote:pillock


Etymology
The origin of pillock is believed to go back to the 16th century meaning penis[1] from the Norwegian word pillicock, presumably akin to the slang dickhead meaning inept fool.
Noun
pillock (plural pillocks)
(UK, mildly pejorative, slang) a stupid or annoying person; simpleton; fool.
Translations
[show ▼]a stupid person
Synonyms[edit]
(British, mildly pejorative, slang, stupid or annoying person): wazzock Plonker
References
^ http://www.allwords.com/word-pillock.html
^ http://www.answers.com/topic/dickhead
Anagrams
lip lock, lip-lock, liplock
Sentence:
(02-26-2014, 12:42 AM)Obadiah Grey Wrote: [ -> ]Billy; wind your neck in you pillock !,, I'm quite happy to ONLY comment on other folks pieces, I have no problem with that.
My favorite: Anagram: Liplock
(02-25-2014, 11:46 PM)ChristopherSea Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-25-2014, 11:08 AM)newsclippings Wrote: [ -> ]Unusual Words

Farctate may be my favorite for now.

Oh my, you can feel the gas pain in that word!

There was a time when antidisestablishmentarianism was the longest word that I knew, but it doesn't measure up to hippopotomonstrosesquipedalian!

Can anyone use these two in a fixed-meter poem?

pshaw

Octasyllabically
Christopher Sea challenged
all of us poets to
write formal verse.

Fitting ridiculous
opposite concepts like
anticontrarian -
ism , what's worse?
(02-26-2014, 01:18 AM)milo Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-25-2014, 11:46 PM)ChristopherSea Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-25-2014, 11:08 AM)newsclippings Wrote: [ -> ]Unusual Words

Farctate may be my favorite for now.

Oh my, you can feel the gas pain in that word!

There was a time when antidisestablishmentarianism was the longest word that I knew, but it doesn't measure up to hippopotomonstrosesquipedalian!

Can anyone use these two in a fixed-meter poem?

pshaw

Octasyllabically
Christopher Sea challenged
all of us poets to
write formal verse.

Fitting ridiculous
opposite concepts like
anticontrarian -
ism , what's worse?

Ha ha, bravo!
(02-26-2014, 02:05 AM)ChristopherSea Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-26-2014, 01:18 AM)milo Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-25-2014, 11:46 PM)ChristopherSea Wrote: [ -> ]Oh my, you can feel the gas pain in that word!

There was a time when antidisestablishmentarianism was the longest word that I knew, but it doesn't measure up to hippopotomonstrosesquipedalian!

Can anyone use these two in a fixed-meter poem?

pshaw

Octasyllabically
Christopher Sea challenged
all of us poets to
write formal verse.

Fitting ridiculous
opposite concepts like
anticontrarian -
ism , what's worse?

Ha ha, bravo!

points for guessing the form.
Double points for using the other in the same form.
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