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Full Version: thai gov gives the order
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to attack the yellow shirts and disperse the crowd.
i think so far 66 have been killed.

is it right that they do this? is there any other way. if so what way would that be.

personally i think the time came to take action in order to get their economy back on track. i'd have used water cannon and tear gas, no live round to be allowed except to protect life.

i'd tell the yellow shirts, protests are allowed with prior notice but the occupation of the city is not allowed. peaceful marches i would allow.
any show of violence and i send in the troops to arrest them and give out appropriate sentences. jmo.
(05-19-2010, 02:01 PM)velvetfog Wrote: [ -> ]The protesters in Bangkok are the "red shirts", not yellow.


Picture of protesters carrying away one of their friends who has been shot.

[Image: THAILAND_-_POLITIC_1272563x.jpg]
yes silly me. they used to be yellow shirts lol.

and the 66 dead is since march. apparently 3 reporters were shot one of them to death

mrmod

I don't know if it's just me but maybe the government should listen to the people and have elections. That might be a bit more democratic. And humanitarian.
(05-20-2010, 02:16 AM)SidewaysDan Wrote: [ -> ]I don't know if it's just me but maybe the government should listen to the people and have elections. That might be a bit more democratic. And humanitarian.
they did offer to listen (negotiate) and were turned down by the red shirts.
when it looked like the military were going in the red shirts all of a sudden decided they wanted to negotiate. all too late because whatever was put on the table by the gov was taken off.

as i see it the people have Thailand have two choices. a revolution, or work towards changing hearts and minds with peaceful demonstrations and marches that are within the law.

i saw them o the news firing home made rockets and shit. not that effective really but at the end of the day that isn't the way to do it. it also looked like many of them were there just for the fun of the confrontation. they seemed so proud to be firing at the military.

mrmod

Nevertheless, the government should take heed. There was already some support for a revolution coming from the army (remember the popular General that got shot in the head?) and the people are very unhappy.

I see your point bill, and I would say that neither side is right. They should be trying to solve this peacefully, not dismember the whole country.
(05-21-2010, 07:18 AM)SidewaysDan Wrote: [ -> ]Nevertheless, the government should take heed. There was already some support for a revolution coming from the army (remember the popular General that got shot in the head?) and the people are very unhappy.

I see your point bill, and I would say that neither side is right. They should be trying to solve this peacefully, not dismember the whole country.
it seems that things are getting back to normal although a curfew is in place.
i think they should have use a heavier hand in the beginning.
if they had it may not have come to the killing stage it's now at. hopefully they'll gain something from whats happened and utilize it the next time.
which i'm sure won't be far away.


what i find reprehensible is the fact the torched their own economy. destroying the 2nd largest mall in asia. what did that actually achieve, how many of their own people did they put out of work?

as for the general;
he wasn't so popular that he couldn't be shot by the very armed forces he was popular with, which i find ironic.

mrmod

(05-21-2010, 09:35 AM)billy Wrote: [ -> ]as for the general;
he wasn't so popular that he couldn't be shot by the very armed forces he was popular with, which i find ironic.

He wasn't popular at all with the Armed Forces. Hence them "popping him one". Also, after direct opposition to the government, the Army gave him a new job of giving dance lessons to troops.

He was very popular with the people. He had worked for the CIA and was a war hero that wrote books. Also he was popular with the people (Red Shirts especially) due to his political views.

Now he's in a comma, after being sniped in the head. Pretty exciting life story. You should look him up (no sources sorry Sad)
(05-21-2010, 09:52 AM)SidewaysDan Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-21-2010, 09:35 AM)billy Wrote: [ -> ]as for the general;
he wasn't so popular that he couldn't be shot by the very armed forces he was popular with, which i find ironic.
He wasn't popular at all with the Armed Forces. Hence them "popping him one". Also, after direct opposition to the government, the Army gave him a new job of giving dance lessons to troops.

He was very popular with the people. He had worked for the CIA and was a war hero that wrote books. Also he was popular with the people (Red Shirts especially) due to his political views.

Now he's in a comma, after being sniped in the head. Pretty exciting life story. You should look him up (no sources sorry Sad)
i thought he'd died already.
i saw a bit about him on the news. it seems obvious why they'd want him out of the way then.

mrmod

He's as good as dead, and it was a very hard blow to the Red Shirts. I still don't think the government should have resorted to violence. If needed they should be defending, not attacking Undecided.
of course i agree, but something had to be done.
maybe water cannon instead of bullets. whatever it was it should never have been allowed to escalate to what it was.
by both factions
(05-22-2010, 02:21 PM)velvetfog Wrote: [ -> ]Thailand has gone from crisis to crisis, and from coup to coup, for the past 80 years.
There has been at least 37 of them.
The country is practically ungovernable.
On the bright side, Burma, next door, is even worse.
myanmar is just an outright travesty of everything lol

when i was in thailand i found it pretty easy going.
i guess the people who live there are finding it hard to get rid of the corruption.